July 30, 2013

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The Week in Sports

By: Anson Whaley

Alfonso Soriano returns to Yankees: In desperate need of offense with so many injuries to key players, the New York Yankees turned to a familiar face, trading for outfielder Alfonso Soriano. Soriano began his career in New York as a second baseman before later playing for the Texas Rangers, Washington Nationals, and most recently, the Chicago Cubs. The outfielder is past his prime, but a recent hot streak was proof that he can still provide a surge of power. After hitting only nine home runs in the first three months of the season, Soriano has hit nearly that many already in July with eight this month heading into this past weekend.

Jeremy Maclin out for year: NFL training camps are underway and that can only mean one thing – injuries won’t be far behind. The biggest casualty thus far may be the Eagles’ young wide receiver, Jeremy Maclin, who is out for the season after tearing an ACL in a practice. With perhaps their best wideout injured, Philadelphia’s season gets off to a rocky start. The team still has DeSean Jackson at receiver, but Maclin’s loss gives rookie head coach Chip Kelly less to work with on offense – his area of expertise.

Jaromir Jagr signs with New Jersey Devils: Even at 41, Jaromir Jagr isn’t ready to hang up his skates. After playing for the Boston Bruins and Dallas Stars last year, the winger has signed a one-year $2 million deal with the New Jersey Devils. Jagr isn’t the player he once was, but still has a little left in the tank after scoring 35 points (including 16 goals in 45 games this past season). Plus, with Ilya Kovalchuk leaving New Jersey to play in Russia, the team was in desperate need of scoring. Jagr ranks eighth all-time among NHL players in scoring and his 681 career goals are good for tenth overall.

Lebron > Kobe in ESPN poll: When it comes to the most popular player in the NBA, LeBron James passed up Kobe Bryant for the first time in a few years according to an ESPN poll. Bryant had beaten out James the past few seasons, but after his second consecutive title, James overtook him last week. Really, it’s just proof that time heals all wounds. Immediately after the much-scrutinized “Decision” broadcast where James announced his intention to leave Cleveland for Miami, he took a huge publicity hit and was even viewed as a villain by many. But after a few years with the Heat and winning a couple of rings, liking LeBron is once again okay.

101 Russian women set a skydiving record: Yeah, I’m not even going to try to add anything to this. Feel free to watch for yourself.

Matt Garza pickup costly for Rangers: Matt Garza may not quite be a household name, but the pitcher could be the best starter that gets dealt before baseball’s trade deadline this season. At 7-1 with a 2.87 ERA, Garza is having a career year and was heavily desired by contenders before he was traded to the Texas Rangers by the Cubs. Garza didn’t come cheap, however. He cost Texas two of their top prospects entering this season, pitcher Justin Grimm and first baseman Mike Olt. Both have struggled to a degree this season, but Grimm has seven wins with the major league team while Olt has 12 home runs in the minors. The trade also cost the Rangers C.J. Edwards, a flamethrower who has dominated Rookie League and Class A in the minors the past two seasons. Also, keep in mind that Garza could only be a rental player as he’s due to become a free agent after this year. All things considered, the Rangers need to not only make the playoffs, but maybe even reach a World Series for this trade to come out in their favor.

Tim Hudson injury hurts Braves: Atlanta Braves pitcher Tim Hudson suffered a devastating injury last week when his ankle was broken by the Mets’ Eric Young, Jr. in a collision at first base. The injury was a big one as the veteran will miss the rest of the season. That hurts Atlanta’s playoff chances at least a bit and the team is already looking around for a potential trade. The Braves hold a comfortable lead in the NL East, but should the team hold on for a playoff spot, Hudson’s veteran presence will be sorely missed in the postseason.

Matt Harvey likely to end season early: Similar to what the Washington Nationals did with prized young pitcher Stephen Strasburg, the New York Mets are planning to keep Matt Harvey on a limit for the rest of the year. Mets manager Terry Collins has said Harvey has about ten more starts left instead of the 13 or so he may reach if he continued to pitch every fifth day. While similar to Strasburg’s situation, though, it’s a bit different considering the Mets aren’t likely to be in the playoffs as the Nats were. One thing that will be interesting, though, is to see if the loss in starts costs Harvey when it comes to the Cy Young voting.

August 2, 2011

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MLB Trade Deadline Winners

By: Joe Williams

 The MLB landscape changed with a flurry of activity in the last few days leading up to the trade deadline. Some teams were able to load up for a playoff run while others tried to unload contracts to build for the future. 

Milwaukee Brewers

Milwaukee made the first move and added Francisco Rodriguez to the bullpen for a team that went all in to win this year when they acquired Zack Greinke and Shaun Marcum to the starting rotation. They also picked up Felipe Lopez to replace the injured Rickie Weeks. With a seven game winning streak, the Brewers have created some separation from the rest of the pack in the NL Central.

Toronto Blue Jays and Colby Rasmus

Although they are too far back to really be in the race in the American League, Toronto landed Colby Rasmus from St. Louis and may have their starting center fielder for the next decade. Rasmus should be glad to leave St. Louis after having problems with manager Tony La Russa.

San Francisco Giants

The defending World Series champions added the biggest bat out there to a lineup that desperately needed a big bat. They proved last year they can pitch their way to a championship. Repeating that task just got a bit easier.

 

Philadelphia Phillies

The Phillies always seem to land a big fish and they did it again. Already considered the favorites in the NL to reach the World Series because of the four big guns in the starting rotation, Philadelphia didn’t have to make a deal. But adding an outfielder hitting .305 with 11 home runs and 63 RBI isn’t a bad idea.

Texas Rangers

Texas scored two of the best setup men in baseball with Mike Adams and Koji Uehara. They have combined to strikeout 111 batters in 95 innings while allowing just 17 walks this season. If they continue to pitch like that, the Rangers will be tough to beat in October.

Cleveland Indians

Cleveland surprised everyone with a major move. They gave up a lot to Colorado for Ubaldo Jimenez. But he gives them a shot to hang in the AL Central all season and for the next two years. With the Browns and Cavaliers struggling, Cleveland fans need something to cheer about and the Indians gave it to them.

Atlanta Braves

Michael Bourn is a nice consolation prize for a team that lost out on Hunter Pence and Carlos Beltran. His speed will totally revamp the top of the Atlanta lineup. He has nearly as many steals (32) as the entire Braves roster (42). He also plays tremendous defense in center.

Pittsburgh Pirates

They did what they had to do. When a team is as bad as the Pirates have been for as long as the Pirates have been, they have to win the fans back. By adding Derrick Lee and Ryan Ludwick, the Pirates improved a little without giving up the young talent they have been developing. It is a long shot for Pittsburgh to come out on top in the NL Central race, but they showed the fans they are trying while really looking ahead to the next couple years.

July 13, 2011

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Sprucing Up the MLB All-Star Festivities

By: Rick Jarrell

Major League Baseball has received their fair share of criticism regarding the Midsummer Classic since Commissioner Bud Selig decided to call the 2002 MLB All-Star Game in the 11th inning, ending it in a tie. In all fairness, the Midsummer Disaster was not Selig’s fault. Each team had run out of available relief pitchers – so the blame should have been each club’s manager for not managing the game well. Or throw a position player on the mount. It’s an exhibition game meant for the fans.

The next season, the league and the player’s union agreed to “make it count” by awarding home field advantage in the World Series to the winner of the game. This is a good idea in theory, but over the past ten years, the American League has dominated the National League in most facets of the game (excluding small ball). Look at the interleague record and past World Series Champs for proof. It’s extremely lopsided. At the risk of sounding like a toddler, it’s clear that placing a prize as important as home field on a lopsided game just isn’t fair.

Chase Field, home of the 2011 All-Star Game

Beyond the negative impact on competitive advantage, the measure didn’t please the fans, the target market of professional sports and especially All-Star games. The players like being selected, I’m sure, but they would also like to take a few days off to charge their batteries for the remainder of a long season.

There’s clearly room for improvement. First of all, why is the game always on a Tuesday? All other major league all-star games are on an “All-Star Weekend” of some type. The answer to this is likely simple – people have other things to do on the weekend, especially during the summer, and are not as likely to watch the Home Run Derby or All-Star Game. But maximizing television ratings (which the MLB is very good at) should not force them to sacrifice the opportunity in front of them. It’s harder for fans to travel on a Monday, Tuesday, or Wednesday. It’s better “to make a weekend of it,” like the NBA has been able to do with their game.

The most interesting parts of other all-star games, in my opinion, are the various skills competitions. The NBA has the dunk contest, dribble obstacle course (or whatever it’s called), and the three point contest. The NHL has a bunch of stuff (I won’t pretend for a second I’m a hockey fan, but I’ve stumbled across their skills competitions, and they’re pretty cool). The NFL has their pass-punt-kick competitions. Why doesn’t the MLB have these?

Baseball is a game of many combined skills, more than any other sport, that often go unnoticed. I say try to quantify them by putting them on display. A few random gimmicks to try…

`1. Outfielder vs. Speedster – Take one of the outfielders with the best arm and one of the fastest players. The outfielder is stationed somewhere in left/right field. The runner starts from home and sprints around the bases. Once they touch 3rd, the outfielder cocks back and lets it loose towards home. They could create some sort of bracket, similar to the Home Run Derby. Who doesn’t like a play at the plate?

2. Targets – Set up targets throughout the infield. Create stations in the outfield for players to aim at targets. It’s similar to the pass-punt-kick, except only throw. I’ve always enjoyed watching relievers long toss before games, why not make it a competition.

3. Crab fights – Place a pool in the parking lot and have players battle it out with each other. Prince Fielder and Brandon Phillips vs. David Ortiz and Jacoby Ellsbury. Who doesn’t want to watch that?

Sure, the last one is off the wall. But when the traditional model is not working, it helps to innovate and do something zanier than the competition is willing to do. If the fans are not happy, it’s time to take a few risks. It may be hard to get any crab fight-esque ideas past the player’s union, but if they resist, force a lockout! (Too soon?) Anyways, there’s plenty of games, competitions, and Quidditch matches that could be integrated into the MLB All-Star festivities. Thoughts, anyone?